Photography Blog Post

Photography Advice

This is my list of ideals, developed over the past 2 years of shooting that has progressed my photography substantially. Two years is not a long period of time for developing a philosophy in an art and my photography is no where near where I would like it to be, it is a constant challenge. The challenge is what keeps me obsessed with photography, where I am good but never good enough. The uphill climb and working past the plateaus is my reward system, social media ‘likes’ are a definite ego booster but unless it comes from another creative then it is taken for what it is, an ego boost.

1. Chimping

Any monkey can press a button. Turn off the auto review option, it is a hard habit to be break but if you stop looking at every shot you take right after you take it, it helps your creativity.  Checking the screen to review your pictures before you export them to your computer is called ‘Chimping’. Forcing yourself to stop chimping will make you try harder by making you worry about your composition and focus. You hopefully will be like, did I get everything in the shot and was the focus on the subject and not on the background. You can learn so much just from waiting until the end to review your results, even if your shots are not to your liking. Imagine how you will feel when the majority of your images are keepers and you didn’t rely on looking at the LCD screen after every shot.

2. Secret to Photography

The biggest secret in photography at being good is taking a lot of pictures. See the world around you and capture it with whatever camera you have, or just capture it with your mind. Is it really that simple, just taking a lot of pictures and then you will become better. Like any athlete they practice what they like to do, so why is that the any different for photography. You get what you put in, if you put in the time your investment will pay off. In the meantime capture the world with whatever camera you have. No matter whether it’s in a cell phone or a top-of-the-line DSLR, a great image is a great image, no matter how it’s captured.

3. Be a Maker

Real artists create. Do you just sit around and think of stuff you could create, photograph, build, or design, but never output anything? Then you’re a poser. Take a new approach and make stuff. So what, if the thing you create is not perfect, but there should always stuff leaving the door and hitting the web, the page, the gallery, or the street. If you are for real, you’ll be pumping out work on the regular. (I’ve seen the criticism of our site on forums with people saying they could make a better website or it’s a crowded space, why try? Can you say you pumped a 2 posts every week for 4 months.)

4. Better than Who?

Don’t aim for ‘better’, aim for ‘different’. It’s funny how related “better” and “different” are. If you aim for ‘better’ that usually means you’re walking in the footsteps of someone else. There will often be someone better than you, someone making those footsteps you’re following… But if you focus on being different–thinking in new ways, creating new things–then you are blazing your own trail. And in blazing your own trail, making your own footprints, you are far more likely to find yourself being ‘better’ without even trying. Better becomes easy because it’s really just different. You can’t stand out from the crowd by just being better. You have to be different.

Remark:

Shooting manual isn’t the most important thing to learn first, it is important but not necessary because it is easier to teach yourself the technical stuff but creativity can not be taught.

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